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Just the Facts Ma’am?

Now that Siri has a bona fide competitor, Google Voice Search, a bit of a kerfuffle has emerged with regard to personalities or lack thereof of these assistants. While Siri strives to project some personality by being conversational and peppering her responses with a bit of whimsy, Google Voice Search is all about just giving us the facts. Each approach has advantages and its vocal adherents. And as the systems’ capabilities leap-frog one another with each new version, the latest incarnation of Google Voice Search seems to have gained some speed and effectiveness advantages versus the current incarnation of Siri. Of course, both of these incarnations promise to be fleeting given the pace of the respective development cycles.

Although Google labels their product “search,” the functionality has clearly already morphed more generally into a recommender—i.e., providing suggestions given a context of various of kinds. This trend is a reflection of a generalization noted in The Learning Layer—plain old search is really best considered just a recommendation in which the context is of a particular type, i.e., a search term provided by the user. The inevitable next step in general-purpose recommender technology is delivering “meta-recommendations”—that is, explanations as to why the recommendation was provided, particularly when an explanation is specifically asked for by the recommendation recipient. A capacity for a limited degree of explanatory capability has already been incorporated into the Apple and Google gals to some degree.

Then comes the really interesting advance—making the recommendations and even the explanations adaptive to the user.  That is, learning from her experiences with us to adapt her recommendations and explanations accordingly. Which is followed by one more short step in which aspects of her overall personality become adaptable to us and our particular circumstances as well. A little humor when called for, a bit of sympathy at other times; and all the while learning as to what works best and when, and tuning accordingly. I’ve got a feeling that at that point, which at the current pace of innovation, is not far away, always just providing the facts will be perceived to be somewhat stilted behavior—coming off like a cheesy movie version of AI of the 1960s.

So my guess is that there are times when, indeed, we are all Joe Friday’s, but more often than not we’ll welcome more than just the facts.